CUNY ASRC & CCNY Seminar in Biochemistry, Biophysics & Biodesign with Chris Fromme, Cornell University Weill Institute for Cell & Molecular Biology


  • Title: How does the Golgi complex make decisions? A biochemical approach reveals extensive crosstalk between GTPase pathways.
  • Abstract:
  • The Golgi complex is the primary sorting organelle at the nexus of the secretory and endocytic trafficking pathways. Once at the Golgi, proteins find themselves at a crossroads: they may be trafficked to the plasma membrane, to endocytic organelles, to lysosomal organelles, to the endoplasmic reticulum, or they may remain within the Golgi complex. The regulators for all incoming and outgoing Golgi traffic are GTPases of the Rab and Arf families. Arf and Rab proteins are activated by GEFs (guanine nucleotide exchange factors), which are the master regulators of these trafficking pathways. Despite knowing the identity of many of these regulators, the molecular and atomic basis for their regulation remains poorly defined. By investigating how the GEFs are regulated my lab aims to uncover the molecular logic governing regulation of the Golgi at a mechanistic level. We have found that Golgi trafficking is regulated through GEF autoinhibition, positive feedback, and GTPase crosstalk mechanisms. Specific protein-protein interactions and the lipid composition of the organelle membrane both play important roles in GEF localization and activity. Our findings indicate that the distinct trafficking pathways intersecting at the Golgi complex are sensed by one another.
  • Wednesdays at noon at the CUNY ASRC Auditorium (unless otherwise noted)
  • Coffee/Tea: 11:30am (CUNY ASRC 1st Floor Tea Room)
  • The ASRC Structural Biology Initiative is proud to run a joint seminar series in Structural Biology and Biochemistry together with the CCNY Department of Chemistry. Seminars are held Wednesdays at noon in the ASRC’s main auditorium, unless otherwise noted. CUNY faculty interested in meeting with visitors are encouraged to directly contact the host at least two weeks in advance of the seminar date.
  • In addition, we’re proud to host a variety of workshops offering technical information on aspects of structural biology techniques.
  • We are happy to include listings of other New York area seminars relevant to the structural biology community; please contact Diane.Beckford@asrc.cuny.edu for more information.
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  • Start Date: 9/27/2017
  • Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
  • College: CUNY Advanced Science Research Center
  • Address: 85 St. Nicholas Terrace, Manhattan
  • Room: Auditorium
  • Phone: 212-413-3221
  • Website: Structbio.asrc.cuny.edu
  • Admission: Free